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Whales are mammals that need to rest and sleep just like humans. However, due to their aquatic lifestyle, whales have evolved some unique sleeping behaviors to ensure they can continue to breathe while sleeping.

Whales are known to practice unihemispheric slow-wave sleep, which means that only one hemisphere of their brain sleeps at a time while the other remains awake and alert. This allows them to continue swimming, come up to the surface to breathe, and stay aware of their surroundings even while resting.

During unihemispheric slow-wave sleep, whales will typically close one eye - the one corresponding to the hemisphere that is resting - while keeping the other eye open to monitor their environment. This adaptation enables them to engage in essential activities like swimming, surfacing for air, and avoiding predators even during their rest periods.

So, in short, whales sleep by alternating between the two hemispheres of their brain, allowing them to rest while still being able to navigate their ocean environment and maintain their vital functions.

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Whales have evolved a unique sleeping behavior known as unihemispheric slow-wave sleep. This means that only one hemisphere of their brain sleeps at a time while the other remains awake and alert. During this type of sleep, whales can continue to swim, come up to the surface to breathe, and stay aware of their surroundings. They typically close one eye corresponding to the sleeping hemisphere while keeping the other eye open to monitor their environment. This allows them to engage in essential activities such as swimming, surfacing for air, and avoiding predators even while resting. By alternating between the two hemispheres of their brain, whales can rest while still being able to navigate their ocean environment and maintain their vital functions.
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